Which JavaScript-Framework?

If the question is, what JavaScript-Framework you should use, finding an answer is usually all about finding out what you already use and what seems to be the feature-richest, fastest and best supported frameworks. If you already use a Framework, just take that one if you’re not only using it for some easy simple stuff like a popup or something. Otherwise, think about what you’ll need the JS-library to do and consult the web. What I have done:

Some Quotes:

“You can save a tremendous amount of time and effort by using the browser-independent framework that JQuery has spent untold man-hours testing, debugging, and proving in the field. While there’s nothing wrong with writing JavaScript, why not speed your development time by writing to the library instead? As I’ve always said, don’t reinvent the wheel, unless you plan on learning more about wheels.” – Jeff Atwood

“A JavaScript framework may not make you a better programmer, but it will make you more efficient. That alone should be reason enough to choose a JavaScript framework, or library if you prefer. Unless you decide to build your own, there are plenty of options available to developers. However, choosing the right framework can be tricky, and weeding through a mess of opinionated fanboys (myself included) is intimidating.” – Brian Reindel

Features-comparison:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_JavaScript_frameworks

(pretty much tells us that Dojo and jQuery rule)

Speed-comparison:

http://www.domassistant.com/slickspeed/

My test resulted in: jQuery fastest, Dojo was close … Protoype and Moo were pretty slow (used Firefox 3.5)

Research and advise:

http://www.dannydouglass.com/post/2008/04/Comparing-Popular-JavaScript-Frameworks.aspx

Conclusion

Think for yourself. I’d always recommend jQuery, as every single developer that has ever used it has fallen in love with it, and it just always ranks best – everywhere. You got all features, high speed, short syntax, small filesize, very good documentation, unnumerable amounts of plugins, tutorials – and a low learning curve. If you can’t trust EVERYONE ELSE, you’ve got to have good reasons to.

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, Posted Monday, August 3rd, 2009 under Reviews.

One comment so far

  1. jquery is really neat, if you want some easy to use and pretty widgets you should also look into Dojo which comes with many useful pre-defined widgets. Bonus for Django users: Dojo can parse Django template code so you can use one templating language for server- and for client-side templating.

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